Former US Marine Demands GMO Ban After Curing Health Problems By Going Organic

June 4th, 2015digestive benefits of vegetables

As the great GMO debate rages on, more and more stories are beginning to surface from individuals who have experienced personal success by eliminating genetically modified foods from their diet.

One such tale comes from a former active Marine, Jon Abrahamson, who recently sent a letter to Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant telling him all about the clearing of his ‘mysterious’ illnesses after removing genetically modified foods from his diet.

As you can imagine, big Pharma companies and many doctors doubt Abrahamson’s claims, but the former active Marine knows better.

In his letter, Jon recalls how he suddenly began to develop nerve problems and numbness in his hands and legs, a degenerative process that left him almost completely incapacitated.

Full article here


100 Restaurant Salads That Are Worse Than a Big Mac

Ordering a salad at a chain restaurant often seems like the healthiest choice to dieters or nutrition-conscious custom

IHOP-salad

ers. However, many restaurant salads are actually loaded with high-fat and high-cholesterol ingredients—like processed meat, cheese, and creamy dressing.

Physicians Committee dietitians compared the nutrition data of salads from more than a dozen

restaurants against the notoriously unhealthful Big Mac. They assessed calories, fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium, looking for salads that exceeded the Big Mac in three of those five categories. Overall, they found more than 100 restaurant salads that are worse than a Big Mac.

Click here to read the full article

100 Restaurant Salads That Are Worse Than a Big Mac

Cholesterol

While cholesterol is a hot-button topic, years of research have linked dietary cholesterol with heart disease. The liver produces all of the cholesterol the body needs to function. Consuming excess cholesterol can result in a build-up of plaque within the arteries.

Fun fact: Only animal-based foods contain cholesterol; plant-based foods are naturally cholesterol free. By keeping your salad focused on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes, it is easy to keep the cholesterol content down to zero!

 


Best Black Bean Soup

Best Black Bean Soup    black bean soup

1 cup black beans
5 cups water or mild-tasting vegetable broth (2 cups to soak, 3 cups to cook)
4-inch piece kombu sea vegetable
1 bay leaf
1 onion, diced
1 cup winter squash, cut in 1 inch cubes
2 large cloves garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 – 3 teaspoons, cumin
Pinch or red pepper flakes
3 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
Garnish; Chopped cilantro, parsley sprigs, or sliced scallions

Sort through beans for stones. Rinse beans. Soak in 2 cups water overnight or 8 hours.
Drain beans and transfer to big stainless steel or earthenware pot with 3 cups fresh water. Bring to slow-boil uncovered for 5 minutes, then skim off the foam.
Add kombu sea vegetable and bay leaf.
Cover and cook on low heat for about 1 ½ hour, until the beans are tender.
Add remaining ingredients and cook about 15 minutes.
Adjust seasonings to taste and amount of liquid to consistency desired.
Add garnish
Makes 4 to 5 servings


6 Dietary Recommendations to reduce risk of several types of cancer

Prevent Cancer Costs by Preventing Cancer

1. Limit or avoid dairy products to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

2. Limit or avoid alcohol to reduce the risk of cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, colon, rectum, and breast.

3. Avoid red and processed meats to reduce the risk of cancers of the colon and rectum. 6 guidelines-cancer-prevention

4. Avoid grilled, fried, and broiled meats to reduce the risk of cancers of the colon, rectum, breast, prostate, kidney, and pancreas.

5. Consume soy products to reduce risk of breast cancer and to reduce the risk of recurrence and mortality for women previously treated for breast cancer.

6. Emphasize fruits and vegetables to reduce risk of several common forms of cancer.

A new report shows that global spending on cancer drugs reached $100 billion last year—a 10.3 percent increase from 2013. Experts predict that, at this rate, spending on cancer medicine will reach $147 billion by 2018.

But we could potentially save billions by halting the rise of lifestyle cancers. Approximately one-third of cancer cases are preventable, according to the World Health Organization. And the American Institute for Cancer Research states that a healthy diet and other lifestyle changes can prevent an estimated 340,000 cancer cases per year.

Physicians Committee doctors and dietitians released a list of six dietary recommendations to help individuals lower their cancer risk. Read the recommendations below to learn how you can help improve your health. After all, prevention is the best form of treatment!  For more detail and background go to The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine