Two Yoga Classes Sunday Morning

Two Sunday Morning Yoga Classes in Mountain View
Many of you ask when and where can you take my yoga classes.
 I mainly teach my group yoga classes for Stanford School of Medicine, which are not open to the public.

When I am able to invite you to a public class, I am happy to do so:
You are invited to a public Yoga Class with Patricia
Sunday April 26th and May 3rd 10:30am-12pm
Yoga is Youthfulness
590 Castro St, Mountain View, in the same building as Wells Fargo Bank (in the back)

New Students Special pricing: 3 classes for $30. One time only.
Hope you can join us!  Come by at 10:15am and get settled in on your mat, for Super Sunday!
The studio has lots of yoga props for us to play with!

Thank you, Sabina, for asking me to sub.

Many ask where else they can take my Yoga classes?!

Happy to let you know you can join us Sunday April 26 and Sunday May 3rd

10:30 -Noon  at Yoga is Youthfulness in


Miracles of Good Nutrition and Yoga

Are you interested in eating healthier, detoxify your body, starting a meditation practice, enjoying happier relationships, and living vibrantly?

My friend, certified yoga teacher and inspiration, Rebecca Snowball, is hosting a no-cost online speaker series to support men and women who are eager to incorporate the teachings of yoga into daily life and feel amazing more of the time.

The online summit, Vibrant Yoga Life, Ignite Your Radiant Health will be featuring 14 experts in the field of yoga, nutrition, and wellness, including me!  Click here to register the free interview series. It’s free.

Join me and several of my colleagues, and get inspired to take yoga off your mat and into your life.

My talk, Magnified Miracles of Good Nutrition and Yoga, is helping to kick off this series on Monday, April 27th, at 2:00pm, PDT.

I would love you to be on the call as I teach you:

  • How to move from feeling stressed to Feeling Playful.  
  • How to create an easy effective gratitude practice to Boost Vitality
  • The “secret” easy way to Lose Weight with your current diet.

This is a convenient and fun way for us come together outside. If you can’t make the call, live, not to worry, every call will be recorded and will be available for 48 hours after each call airs.

Click here to register for the free interview series and I’ll see you on the call.


Save $100 & Have Loads of fun in the Tahoe National Forest July 4-12, 2015

Sign Up NOW and Save $100! Join us for loads of fun in the Tahoe National Forest in California’s High Sierra for the 46th annual French Meadows Summer Camp. 2015 is the FINAL camp at French Meadows. Don’t miss it! July 4-12, 2015

Register and pay in full by May 1, 2015 and receive a $100 discount for the 2015 French Meadows Summer Camp.

Visit our Registration page for full details. NOTE: All prices include a 1-year membership/subscription to Macrobiotics Today magazine per household.


The Myth of High Protein Diets

MANY people have been making the case that Americans have grown fat because they eat too much starch and sugar, and not enough meat, fat and eggs. Recently, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee lifted recommendations that consumption of dietary cholesterol should be restricted, citing research that dietary cholesterol does not have a major effect on blood cholesterol levels. The predictable headlines followed: “Back to Eggs and Bacon?”

But, alas, bacon and egg yolks are not health foods.

Although people have been told for decades to eat less meat and fat, Americans actually consumed 67 percent more added fat, 39 percent more sugar, and 41 percent more meat in 2000 than they had in 1950 and 24.5 percent more calories than they had in 1970, according to the Agriculture Department. Not surprisingly, we are fatter and unhealthier.

A study published last March found a 75 percent increase in premature deaths from all causes, and a 400 percent increase in deaths from cancer and Type 2 diabetes, among heavy consumers of animal protein under the age of 65 — those who got 20 percent or more of their calories from animal protein.

The more people adhered to these recommendations (including reducing the amount of fat and cholesterol they consumed), the more improvement we measured — at any age. But for reversing disease, a whole-foods, plant-based diet seems to be necessary.

In addition, what’s good for you is good for our planet. Livestock production causes more disruption of the climate than all forms of transportation combined. And because it takes as much as 10 times more grain to produce the same amount of calories through livestock as through direct grain consumption, eating a plant-based diet could free up resources for the hungry.

What you gain is so much more than what you give up.

Source: “The Myth of High-Protein Diets” by Dean Ornish MD, The Opinion Pages, The New York Times, March 23, 2015