6 Dietary Recommendations to reduce risk of several types of cancer

Prevent Cancer Costs by Preventing Cancer

1. Limit or avoid dairy products to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

2. Limit or avoid alcohol to reduce the risk of cancers of the mouth, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, colon, rectum, and breast.

3. Avoid red and processed meats to reduce the risk of cancers of the colon and rectum. 6 guidelines-cancer-prevention

4. Avoid grilled, fried, and broiled meats to reduce the risk of cancers of the colon, rectum, breast, prostate, kidney, and pancreas.

5. Consume soy products to reduce risk of breast cancer and to reduce the risk of recurrence and mortality for women previously treated for breast cancer.

6. Emphasize fruits and vegetables to reduce risk of several common forms of cancer.

A new report shows that global spending on cancer drugs reached $100 billion last year—a 10.3 percent increase from 2013. Experts predict that, at this rate, spending on cancer medicine will reach $147 billion by 2018.

But we could potentially save billions by halting the rise of lifestyle cancers. Approximately one-third of cancer cases are preventable, according to the World Health Organization. And the American Institute for Cancer Research states that a healthy diet and other lifestyle changes can prevent an estimated 340,000 cancer cases per year.

Physicians Committee doctors and dietitians released a list of six dietary recommendations to help individuals lower their cancer risk. Read the recommendations below to learn how you can help improve your health. After all, prevention is the best form of treatment!  For more detail and background go to The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine


Sea Vegetable and Seaweed Health Benefits

Sea Vegetables are extremely concentrated sources of nutrients.

Dried dulse and nori are 20 to 34% protein. All sea weeds are rich in calcium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, zinc, and iodine. Vitamins A, C, B complex, B12.

 

My first video….  not perfect …they will get better.  Your comments are welcome.


Sugar, Where it Does Not Belong

Sugar has a sneaky way of showing up in places where it doesn’t really belong. You expect the sweetness to appear in desserts, candy-coated treats and donuts, but in your hamburger?

Sugar’s near-ubiquity in processed and packaged foods makes limiting one’s daily sugar intake — a choice from which nearly anyone could benefit — a more difficult task. Krispy Kreme’s original glazed contains 10 grams of the stuff, but while we expect a donut to be extra sweet, savory foods such as a meatball sub and foods that are marketed as “healthy” — such as Greek yogurt — can easily get by a person’s sugar radar.

For the average adult, the World Health Organization recommends a daily intake of 25 grams of sugar, or about two and a half Krispy Kremes. According to Natasa Janicic-Kahric, an associate professor of medicine at Georgetown University Hospital, many Americans eat around five times the recommended amount of sugar.

Overdoing it with sugar may increase a person’s risk for heart disease, obesity and diabetes.  A third of American children are overweight or obese, which puts them at a greater risk for developing diabetes later in life. And recent research has found that sugar can get in the way of cognitive function or even put people in a bad mood. In more serious cases, sugar-laden foods may exacerbate experiences of depression and anxiety.

If you avoid dessert and sweet treats, but don’t keep track of the incidental sugar in your meals, you are mistaken.  Check below!

Thank you huffingtonpost.com

sugar not where

 


Patricia’s Potato Salad

The potatoes at the Farmer Markets have been looking so fresh and beautiful…I thought a good time to share this recipe from a cooking class I taught several years ago.  For the best taste please choose all organic ingredients. Hope you enjoy!

Patricia’s Potato Salad

5     large red potatoes, cooked, cooled and peeled
2      celery sticks, sliced
2     small kosher pickles, diced
1     small cucumber
1/3 C parsley, minced
1 T Dulse sea vegetable flakes

Toss all the above ingredients in a bowl. Blend the dressing ingredients and pour over the salad. Best when marinated for a few hours.

      Dressing

1      T olive oil
1      T mustard
1      T and 1 t balsamic vinegar
1      T and 1 t umeboshi vinegar
3/4  C nayonaise or mayonnaise
1/4  t pepper


Make it Easy- Eat Local Whole Foods!

Limit packaged, canned, highly processed and refined foods from far away!   Dr. T. Colin Campbell stresses the importance of a plant-based diet.  He explains the relationship of animal protein to the modern pattern of disease as well as the limitations of modern nutritional science when applied in a fragmented, reductionist way. 

For The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted Read “The China Study” by T. Colin Campbell

Did you know the Surgeon General in Portugal Endorses a Plant based Diet?