4 Summer Time Health Tips

Cool off this summer with yoga, meditation and breathing techniques. Stay focused, healthy and happy with some simple practices.

4 Yoga Tips to Cool Off This Summer

One season flows into another – each one brings its set of changes. A yogi will simply look at the changes and act accordingly. Here are some best practices and tips to ensure the body and mind stay fit.

You could choose a favorite yoga tip and practice it regularly or even do all.

#1: The secret is in your breath

The next time you have a few minutes before you rush out for the day, try the body cooling pranayama.
1. Stick your tongue out and curl the sides of the tongue upward towards the center of the tongue.

2. Breathe in through the mouth, hold the breath and slowly exhale through the nose.

Repeat five to 10 times.

#2: Drink up

The more you hydrate yourself, the better. With 70 percent of water in your body, you’d better ensure there’s lot of liquid out there.

Besides drinking extra fluids, you could include the alternative nostril breathing  in your routine. Here’s how:

1. Close the right nostril with your right thumb.

2. Exhale completely through the left nostril and then breathe in through the left nostril.

3. Close the left nostril with your little ring finger and exhale through the right.

Repeat five to 10 times.

#3: Slow down on yoga poses

Yoga poses practiced gently and meditatively balance the mind and body and are beneficial at any time of the year.

Strenuous physical activity or yoga increases body temperature, best to avoid in summer and save for cooler months. Early in the morning or late in the evening are the best times to practice yoga postures during summer.

#4 Watch what you Consume

Reduce intake of spicy food, tea, coffee and sugar.MFM_FinalLogo_CMYK1

Avoid fatty food because it puts extra burden on the digestive system and heart.

Consume larger quantities of fruits, raw and cooked vegetables

Minimize consumption of non-vegetarian food.

Increase your intake of water add a option squeeze of lemon or lime with a pinch of salt.

Last but not least;

After a long day, do you want to unwind in the evening? Lie down near a wall – with your legs and feet up the wall in a comfortable manner.  Stay  for a 2 or 3 minutes.  Bring the legs down and rest in Shavasana.  These yoga poses are refreshing and restorative. How does this work? Since the heart is pumping out more blood, when the temperature is high, this yoga pose helps the heart by returning more blood back to the heart. (use gravity to bring the blood back to the heart.)

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Beginning Yoga: Barriers of Entry

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

We’ve all had this moment…

Meditation is also hard. Have you ever tried to sit still and find mental and emotional clarity and stillness? “My back hurts…I’m hungry…we are out of milk…” Sound familiar?

Yoga culture itself can be strange. Do you need tight and bright exercise clothing? Do you need to talk in new-agey self-help slogans? Do you need to wear beads around your neck and your wrists? Do you need to have an OM sticker on your car, or tattooed on your body?

According to the 2012 study “Yoga in America:”

  • 20.4 million Americans currently participate in yoga
  • Almost 105 million Americans are interested but have so far not participated, or have participated in the past, and would like to start again.

And yet, the benefits are many:

On its most surface level, yoga is a challenging and fun discipline that keeps the body fit.Noah in Mountain-Pose-1-e1401397539434
It regulates the internal organs and balances the circulatory, respiratory, and hormonal systems.

Yoga alleviates stress, aids in the healing of physical injuries and illnesses.

Yoga helps us to reclaim our general sense of well-being; physically, emotionally, and spiritual.

What are your barriers of entry? Or, what were your barriers of entry?

For more information on YOGAMAZÉ101: 40 Days of Yoga to Change Your Life, or to register for the course, go to: http://yogamaze.net/yoga-101-practice/

editation is also hard. Have you ever tried to sit still and find mental and emotional clarity and stillness? “My back hurts…I’m hungry…we are out of milk…” Sound familiar?

Yoga culture itself can be strange. Do you need tight and bright exercise clothing? Do you need to talk in new-agey self-help slogans? Do you need to wear beads around your neck and your wrists? Do you need to have an OM sticker on your car, or tattooed on your body?

According to the 2012 study “Yoga in America:”

  • 20.4 million Americans currently participate in yoga
  • Almost 105 million Americans are interested but have so far not participated, or have participated in the past, and would like to start again.

And yet, the benefits are many:

On its most surface level, yoga is a challenging and fun discipline that keeps the body fit.
It regulates the internal organs and balances the circulatory, respiratory, and hormonal systems.

Yoga alleviates stress, aids in the healing of physical injuries and illnesses.

Yoga helps us to reclaim our general sense of well-being; physically, emotionally, and spiritual.

What are your barriers of entry? Or, what were your barriers of entry?

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf


Yoga for a Healthy Back

Yoga for a Healthy Back

Common Ground Garden Supply and Education Center  559 College Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306
Saturday, May 24
10:30 – 12:30 $31 Click to Register

Gardeners and high-tech computer people alike want to take care of their backs to live a full happy life. Learn the best practices and methods for keeping your back muscles healthy. Learn thigh stretches and strengthening yoga poses for your thighs to improve your back. Good alignment in your legs translates to your back. Get empowered to help you and your back feel better. Even if it is good now, let’s keep it that way! Taught by Patricia Becker who is the Common Ground Center Manager and has been teaching Yoga for Healthy back class- In Twist, Juice it Up!yoga classes locally and at Stanford University.