Edible Landscaping Tour

Common Ground’s 8th Annual Edible Landscaping Tour

Saturday, July 19th, 2014   10am-4pm

  • Explore local organically-grown edible gardens2014-07-16 19.08.37
  • Learn about Grow Biointensive & organic gardening practices
  • Meet the creative gardeners & get great ideas
  • Bicycle Friendly

Tour Highlights: Water Saving Techniques, Fruit Trees, Raised Beds & Berries, Chickens & Coops, Greenhouses, Herb, Flower & Native Plantings, Composting, and Lots of Vegetables!    Check out the Palo Alto Weekly article

Read the garden descriptions before you prick up the map Saturday Morning.  Garden Descriptions

Click Here to Register



Beginning Yoga: Barriers of Entry

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

We’ve all had this moment…

Meditation is also hard. Have you ever tried to sit still and find mental and emotional clarity and stillness? “My back hurts…I’m hungry…we are out of milk…” Sound familiar?

Yoga culture itself can be strange. Do you need tight and bright exercise clothing? Do you need to talk in new-agey self-help slogans? Do you need to wear beads around your neck and your wrists? Do you need to have an OM sticker on your car, or tattooed on your body?

According to the 2012 study “Yoga in America:”

  • 20.4 million Americans currently participate in yoga
  • Almost 105 million Americans are interested but have so far not participated, or have participated in the past, and would like to start again.

And yet, the benefits are many:

On its most surface level, yoga is a challenging and fun discipline that keeps the body fit.Noah in Mountain-Pose-1-e1401397539434
It regulates the internal organs and balances the circulatory, respiratory, and hormonal systems.

Yoga alleviates stress, aids in the healing of physical injuries and illnesses.

Yoga helps us to reclaim our general sense of well-being; physically, emotionally, and spiritual.

What are your barriers of entry? Or, what were your barriers of entry?

For more information on YOGAMAZÉ101: 40 Days of Yoga to Change Your Life, or to register for the course, go to: http://yogamaze.net/yoga-101-practice/

editation is also hard. Have you ever tried to sit still and find mental and emotional clarity and stillness? “My back hurts…I’m hungry…we are out of milk…” Sound familiar?

Yoga culture itself can be strange. Do you need tight and bright exercise clothing? Do you need to talk in new-agey self-help slogans? Do you need to wear beads around your neck and your wrists? Do you need to have an OM sticker on your car, or tattooed on your body?

According to the 2012 study “Yoga in America:”

  • 20.4 million Americans currently participate in yoga
  • Almost 105 million Americans are interested but have so far not participated, or have participated in the past, and would like to start again.

And yet, the benefits are many:

On its most surface level, yoga is a challenging and fun discipline that keeps the body fit.
It regulates the internal organs and balances the circulatory, respiratory, and hormonal systems.

Yoga alleviates stress, aids in the healing of physical injuries and illnesses.

Yoga helps us to reclaim our general sense of well-being; physically, emotionally, and spiritual.

What are your barriers of entry? Or, what were your barriers of entry?

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf

Yoga is very popular. It’s everywhere. It seems like everyone does it. And yet, if you don’t currently do yoga, it can be difficult and intimidating to begin.

What are the barriers of entry?

For starters, yoga poses are hard. The classical form of most poses is inaccessible to most people. We are constantly bombarded by images in the media of pretty people and celebrities doing flexible and strong poses. They make the most difficult poses look easy, enticing us to try this ancient discipline with it’s many benefits. However, our initial attempts rarely match our ideas about how yoga is “supposed” to feel or look.

– See more at: http://blog.yogamaze.net/?p=1#sthash.RDgppt6H.dpuf


Trika with Noah May 25, 2014 Yoga Tree MissionTrika with Noah May 25, 2014 close up Yoga Tree Mission   Having fun with Noah Maze Yoga Teacher Training in San  May 25, 2014 Francisco

Trikonasana, Trikonasana, Trikonasana…..!

Trikonasana is usually performed in two parts, facing left, and then facing right. The practitioner begins standing with the feet one leg-length apart, knees unbent, turns the right foot completely to the outside and the left foot less than 45 degrees to the inside, keeping the heels in line with the hips. The arms are spread out to the sides, parallel to the ground, palms facing down; the trunk is extended as far as is comfortable to the right, while the arms remain parallel to the floor. Once the trunk is fully extended to the right, the right arm is dropped so that the right hand reaches the shin (or a block or on the floor) to the front (left side) of the right foot, with the palm down if flexed. The left arm is extended vertically, and the spine and trunk are gently twisted counterclockwise (i.e., upwards to the left, since they’re roughly parallel to the floor), using the extended arms as a lever, while the spine remains parallel to the ground. The arms are stretched away from one another, and the head is often turned to gaze at the left thumb, slightly intensifying the spinal twist. Returning to standing, the bend is then repeated to the left.


Yoga for a Healthy Back

Yoga for a Healthy Back

Common Ground Garden Supply and Education Center  559 College Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306
Saturday, May 24
10:30 – 12:30 $31 Click to Register

Gardeners and high-tech computer people alike want to take care of their backs to live a full happy life. Learn the best practices and methods for keeping your back muscles healthy. Learn thigh stretches and strengthening yoga poses for your thighs to improve your back. Good alignment in your legs translates to your back. Get empowered to help you and your back feel better. Even if it is good now, let’s keep it that way! Taught by Patricia Becker who is the Common Ground Center Manager and has been teaching Yoga for Healthy back class- In Twist, Juice it Up!yoga classes locally and at Stanford University.